New York Law Journal Religion Law Column on Security for Houses of Worship

In the March edition of the Religion Law column in the New York Law Journal, partner Barry Black and counsel Lane Paulsen discuss assistance for houses of worship from recent government regulations, the First Amendment implications of these government actions, and offer a guide for steps that institutions can take to protect themselves.

Read the full article here: “Security for Houses of Worship: The Law, and Practical Steps To Take”

New York Law Journal Religion Law Column from Barry Black and Jonathan Nelson

In their latest New York Law Journal Religion Law column, Barry Black and Jonathan Nelson tackle a subject that has led to decades of confusion in the legal system and woven a complex web of decisions to interpret: when can courts decide disputes between local churches and their denominations. Check out the full article as Barry and Jonathan review the law and suggest solutions to mitigate risk across the board.

New York Law Journal “When Can Courts Decide Disputes Between Local Churches and Their Denominations?”

Jonathan Robert Nelson Honored by Geeta and Divya Dham Temples

On June 15, 2019, partner Jonathan Robert Nelson was honored by the Geeta and the Divya Dham temples for the successful representation of the congregation in a dispute over ownership of the temple, the largest Hindi temple in Queens, that dragged on over a decade. The commemoration featured speeches from Swami Satyanandji, head of the denomination, as well as their chief administrator from India. The ceremony culminated in Mr. Nelson receiving a plaque displaying gratitude and thanks from Holy Geeta Temple.  

NYLJ Religion Law Column Authored by NMB – Hiring and Firing of Clergy

In the Friday, May 31, 2019 issue of the New York Law Journal, NMB partners Barry Black and Jonathan Nelson examine the differences of between hierarchical and congregational governing structures of religious institutions, and the understanding of the roles that trustees and congregations have authority over of hiring and firing affairs. Barry and Jonathan also outline practical considerations for congregations to be mindful of when making decisions about clergy.

Check out a link to the full New York Law Journal article here.

 

Senator Ted Cruz Begins Investigation of Yale Law School Over Alleged Religious Discrimination

On April 4, after Yale Law School announced that it “will not financially support employment positions unless they are open to all of our student body” and that it “will not fund the work of an employer that refuses to hire students because they are, for instance, Christian,
black, a veteran, or gay,” U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) notified Yale Law School Dean Heather Gerken of his intention to investigate Yale’s policy.

On April 4, after Yale Law School announced that it “will not financially support employment positions unless they are open to all of our student body” and that it “will not fund the work of an employer that refuses to hire students because they are, for instance, Christian, black, a veteran, or gay,” U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) notified Yale Law School Dean Heather Gerken of his intention to investigate Yale’s policy.

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Religious School Students’ Suit Challenging Vermont Program Gains Justice Department Support

The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a statement of interest in a case pending in the
U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont in support of parents and parochial high school
students who claim that Vermont has discriminated against them in violation of the Free Exercise
Clause of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

The plaintiffs in the case, A.M. v. French, assert that their Free Exercise rights have been
violated because the state does not permit them to participate in a state program that pays tuition
for high school students to take up to two college courses. 

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Federal Government Releases Final ‘Conscience Rule’

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has issued its final “conscience rule.”

In a statement, the HHS said that the 440 page final rule “protects individuals and health care entities from discrimination on the basis of their exercise of conscience in HHS-funded programs.” The HHS added that the final rule implements “full and robust enforcement of approximately 25 provisions passed by Congress protecting longstanding conscience rights in healthcare.”

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7th Circuit Upholds ‘Parsonage Allowance’ Against First Amendment Challenge

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit, reversing a district court’s decision, has ruled that the Internal Revenue Code provision excluding housing allowances from ministers’ taxable income does not violate the First Amendment and is not unconstitutional.

The Parsonage Allowance

After the Sixteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1913, authorizing Congress to levy an income tax, Congress enacted the federal income tax. Thereafter, the Treasury Department adopted the “convenience-of-the-employer” doctrine in connection with the definition of taxable “income.” Under that doctrine, housing provided to employees for the convenience of their employer is exempt from the employees’ taxable income.

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This Time, US Supreme Court Stops an Execution Where State Refuses Minister’s Presence

Just about one month after the U.S. Supreme Court permitted Domineque Ray, a Muslim prisoner, to be executed without his minister being present, the Court stopped another execution where a prisoner was denied the presence of his spiritual advisor.

In Murphy v. Collier, 587 U. S. ____ (2019), the Court stayed the execution of Patrick Murphy by the state of Texas, declaring that the state “may not carry out Murphy’s execution” unless the state “permits Murphy’s Buddhist spiritual advisor or another Buddhist reverend of the [s]tate’s choosing to accompany Murphy in the execution chamber during the execution.”

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